U of A teams up with venture capital firm to advance agricultural innovation

Partnership with SVG Ventures|THRIVE will help researchers and startups move new technologies

U of A teams up with venture capital firm to advance agricultural innovationThe University of Alberta is partnering with a leading Silicon Valley firm to support innovation growth in Alberta’s agriculture and food sectors. An agreement with SVG Ventures|THRIVE, a venture capital firm investing in agricultural technology startups and supporting corporations with open innovation, powers the U of A to accelerate its development and adoption of technology-driven solutions…

Lime shows promise for controlling clubroot in canola crops

Spot-treating soil with lime could give farmers another option to stem the costly disease and improve soil health

Lime shows promise for controlling clubroot in canola cropsLime is showing promise as an additional way to help manage clubroot, a deadly disease in canola crops, University of Alberta research shows. Spot-treating soil with the mineral reduced the overall occurrence and severity of the disease by 35 to 91 per cent, growth experiments showed. The finding, published in the Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology,…

Researchers pinpoint genetic defects that cause heart failure

Alberta heart donors critical for breakthrough research, pointing way to targeted treatments

Researchers pinpoint genetic defects that cause heart failureAn international research team has identified individual genetic defects that lead to heart failure, opening the door to more targeted diagnosis, prevention and treatment. In research published recently in the academic journal Science, the team analyzed cells from 61 failing and 18 healthy hearts using single-cell genetic sequencing. “For the first time, we were able to map out…

Shedding light on injury-related ER visits for homeless

Detailed data will help community organizations in Alberta develop effective injury prevention programs

Shedding light on injury-related ER visits for homelessA new report from the Injury Prevention Centre is the first in Alberta to provide data on injury-related emergency department visits by people experiencing houselessness – information that will help community organizations deliver injury prevention programs tailored to the distinct health-care needs of this population. “This is the first step in understanding what the injury issues are,” says…

What to do when you see wildlife on urban trails

Four tips on making wildlife encounters of every description safe and enjoyable for all parties

What to do when you see wildlife on urban trailsIt seems one can’t swing a cat without hitting a coyote, a jackrabbit, a Canada goose, or a bear – and not just in the far-flung wilderness. Wildlife encounters are now common in cities, with urban populations of coyotes, skunks and Canada geese increasing throughout North America. Here are four tips on making wildlife encounters…

U of A programs in business, engineering take top place in Canada

Business administration, engineering, nursing, and biological and agricultural sciences ranked in top three in Canada and top 50 worldwide

U of A programs in business, engineering take top place in CanadaUniversity of Alberta programs in business, engineering, nursing and agricultural sciences rank among the top three in Canada, according to new global rankings. The U of A’s business administration program was ranked the best in Canada and 30th in the world, according to the 2022 Global Ranking of Academic Subjects, or GRAS, after climbing steadily in…

Running Everest Marathon takes a community to reach your goals

Edmontonian Kate Storey ran the 42.2-km Everest Marathon. It took her seven and a half hours

Running Everest Marathon takes a community to reach your goals  When you hear stories about Everest, they usually involve people trying to get up the mountain. Not for Kate Storey. At the end of May, she ran the Everest Marathon – a 42.2-km race down the mountain from Everest’s South Base Camp that took her seven and a half hours. She finished as the second-quickest international…

Parasites may be taking heavy toll on mammal populations

May not kill, but have heavy effect on mammals overall health

Parasites may be taking heavy toll on mammal populationsA new study looking at research on parasitic worms suggests the pesky, but pervasive creatures have a far greater impact on the health of mammal populations than previously known. “Parasites don't have to kill the animal to control a population,” says Kyle Shanebeck, a PhD student in the Faculty of Science’s Department of Biological Sciences…

Five things you should know about eating a high-protein diet

Many people could benefit from getting more plant- and animal-based sources in their meals

Five things you should know about eating a high-protein dietWhen it comes to healthy eating, it’s not always clear what should be on your plate – and in what amounts. What is clear, according to Carla Prado, is that most people can benefit from more protein in their diet. Our bodies need protein to maintain muscle mass and support biological functions such as healing…

Plant diversity promotes healthier land: study

Increases phosphorus needed for plant growth and reproduction

Plant diversity promotes healthier land: studyA new study is the first to show on a global scale that conserving plant diversity boosts a nutrient crucial for healthy land, including productive croplands. An analysis of 180 studies done worldwide on farm fields, grasslands, forests and pot-grown experiments showed that overall, mixtures of diverse plant species increased the availability of phosphorus in…

Researchers engineering new drug to beat blood cancers

RNA technology used to target gene defects in blood cells that lead to diseases like leukemia

Researchers engineering new drug to beat blood cancersA University of Alberta researcher is hot on the trail of a new drug to combat blood cancers. Based on RNA technology — best known for the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines — the drug targets specific gene defects in blood cells responsible for cancers such as leukemia. “With conventional cancer drugs, there is a…

More support options needed for couples considering divorce

With few couples seeking traditional therapy, lower-key approaches could help

More support options needed for couples considering divorceA survey of 745 troubled couples who were thinking about divorce showed that 80 per cent of them weren’t seeking professional help but turning instead to friends, books and websites for advice, according to a recent University of Alberta study. That combination of ambiguity and lack of professional guidance can prevent people from effectively sorting through…

Innovative teacher brings skateboarding into class

New program allows students to create their own skateboard brand and business for high school credit

Innovative teacher brings skateboarding into classUniversity of Alberta grad Kristian Basaraba, ’01 BEd, has been skateboarding for over 30 years. But the high school teacher never thought he’d be leaning so heavily on the sport in the classroom. In 2019, he started the Sk8trepreneur program at Salisbury Composite High School in Sherwood Park, Alta., challenging students to create their own…

Animal welfare laws need to be strengthened in Canada

Gaps in regulations and enforcement leave companion animals, livestock vulnerable to abuse

Animal welfare laws need to be strengthened in CanadaWhen it comes to laws protecting pets and livestock, Canada receives a failing grade. In 2020, an international organization called World Animal Protection gave the country a D, placing it among a group that includes Tanzania, Peru and the United States. The reason for that dismal ranking comes down to the “split jurisdiction” of Canadian federalism, according…

Engineering clubs a path to a future career

Student clubs offer a taste of what it means to work together on a multifaceted design project

Engineering clubs a path to a future careerEngineering clubs are created by students and for students. They provide a sandbox that lets future engineers make new things, sometimes starting with mistakes. COVID-19 jeopardized the clubs, but they’re coming back strong and punching above their weight. “It’s not something that you expect a group of students to take on because of the technical…

Not enough men in their 40s get screened for diabetes: study

Undiagnosed, untreated illness could lead to heart disease later in life, says lead researcher

Not enough men in their 40s get screened for diabetes: studyNot enough men in Alberta – especially those in their 40s – are getting tested for diabetes, putting them at risk for heart disease, cancer and other illnesses, according to new population health research published in The Lancet Regional Health – Americas. “My main message to young men is that early diagnosis is critical because diabetes…

Researchers create new method for making lifelike aquatic artificial habitats

Studying living habitats that attract and retain different organisms is crucial in restoration planning

Researchers create new method for making lifelike aquatic artificial habitatsResearchers have devised a new method of making lifelike aquatic artificial habitats that could help scientists better understand and restore real-world environments. Aneri Garg, who completed the research as part of her master’s studies under the supervision of Stephanie Green, first developed the 3D scanning, printing, moulding and casting (3D-SPMC) method on a project involving coral reefs. As…

Researcher aims to squeeze extra life out of lithium ion batteries

Improving charge capacity could offer big advantages for manufacturers and consumers

Researcher aims to squeeze extra life out of lithium ion batteriesCruising down the highway in an electric car, who wouldn’t want to squeeze a few hundred extra kilometres out of a single battery charge? University of Alberta researcher Jasper Woodard is hoping to achieve just that. He’s working to improve a particular component in the lithium-ion batteries that power electric vehicles (EVs) – and everyday…

Rethinking the history of the Lakota of the Great Plains

Governor General’s Gold Medal winner Claire Thomson is challenging settler narratives

Rethinking the history of the Lakota of the Great PlainsGrowing up on a ranch in the Wood Mountain Uplands of southwestern Saskatchewan, Claire Thomson’s family history was always important to her. That interest led her to pursue graduate studies in History, where she couldn’t help noticing that previous histories of the Lakota of the Wood Mountain Uplands all end with Sitting Bull returning to…

New soil database will help Alberta farmers plot out sustainable practices

Digging into decades’ worth of data to gauge soil health across the province

New soil database will help Alberta farmers plot out sustainable practicesA new project is, for the first time, harnessing information from thousands of soil samples into one big database to get an idea of how healthy the province’s agricultural soils are. The two-year initiative brings together decades of data collection on soil samples from 44 benchmark sites across the province so that they can be…

New strains of wheat sought with built-in resistance to wheat midge

There’s currently only one genetic defence to protect from wheat midge – but researchers want to change that

New strains of wheat sought with built-in resistance to wheat midge Agricultural scientists in Western Canada are teaming up to give wheat a boost of built-in resistance to a destructive pest. “Wheat midge is the number one insect pest threatening wheat crops across Western Canada,” says James Harynuk, a professor in the University of Alberta’s Faculty of Science. Harynuk notes that wheat midge can cause about $60…

Pharmacists could bridge gap by offering more sexual health services

An area for future growth for pharmacists

Pharmacists could bridge gap by offering more sexual health servicesPharmacists could reduce barriers for people seeking sexual and reproductive health-care services, new research shows. Many pharmacists already offer some support for sexual and reproductive health, including administering contraceptives and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccinations. But further training and expansion of these services could help increase access and reduce inequities in this key area of health…

U of A launches Indigenous-led strategic plan

Plan ensures Indigenous identities, languages, cultures and worldviews are reflected at the U of A

U of A launches Indigenous-led strategic planThe University of Alberta is launching a strategic plan to respond to the calls to action in the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s Final Report. Braiding Past, Present and Future: University of Alberta Indigenous Strategic Plan aims to dismantle colonial structures in the university that have long “disenfranchised Indigenous Peoples of their legal, social, cultural, religious…

Study challenges the link between obesity and junk food advertising

Banning junk food advertising may have little effect on reducing obesity

Study challenges the link between obesity and junk food advertisingA new study from the University of Alberta challenges the notion that advertising junk food is at the root of the obesity epidemic. Growing up in a low social-economic environment is more of a precursor to obesity later in life than junk food advertising, according to the report, with adults who grew up in a…

Physical wellness partnership connects students with Alberta Indigenous

U of A students work with Indigenous Sport Council of Alberta to turn data into solutions

Physical wellness partnership connects students with Alberta IndigenousThe COVID-19 pandemic forced a lot of organizations to rethink how they were serving their communities – for some, those pivots took them exactly where they needed to go. That was certainly the case with a new partnership between the Indigenous Sport Council of Alberta (ISCA) and the University of Alberta’s Faculty of Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation.…

Four critical things to know about critical race theory

Why an academic theory that dates back to the 1970s has become a political lightning rod today

Four critical things to know about critical race theoryIn April of this year, Georgia became the latest of 15 American states to ban the teaching of critical race theory in schools. In celebrating a similar ban in Mississippi, Republican Gov. Tate Reeves recorded a video in which he claimed, without evidence, that school children had been “dragged to the front of the classroom and coerced…

Can beavers catch chronic wasting disease?

New research suggests beavers may be susceptible to the fatal illness – increasing spread between species

Can beavers catch chronic wasting disease?Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an infectious disease that affects the central nervous systems of animals, typically affecting cervids such as deer, elk and moose. “CWD is always fatal. There’s no cure; there are no treatments,” says Debbie McKenzie, a professor in the Department of Biological Sciences. CWD is increasing its geographic range as well…

Theatre grad works to break down institutional barriers from within

Deneh’Cho Thompson found that traditional systems hindered his progress. So he set out to change them

Theatre grad works to break down institutional barriers from withinDeneh’Cho Thompson confesses to a mild rebellious streak in his youth. As a high school student in Calgary, he fell short of completing his diploma for “myriad reasons,” he says. Though he enjoyed many subjects and excelled in some, drama was the subject that most held his interest. Thompson eventually enrolled in a theatre program…

Clot-busting drug used for heart attacks effective in treatment of stroke

Could become the standard treatment for acute ischemic stroke

Clot-busting drug used for heart attacks effective in treatment of strokeTenecteplase (TNK), a common clot-busting drug used in people suffering from a heart attack, is a safe and effective treatment for those in the midst of acute ischemic stroke, reports a University of Alberta research team involved in the largest stroke clinical trial in Canadian history. Brian Buck, a neurology professor in the University of…

Grad brings new perspective on Indigenous history to museum work

Native studies, environmental science grad Lauren Comba now better able to respect Indigenous stories

Grad brings new perspective on Indigenous history to museum workWatching the Inuit film Atanarjuat: The Fast Runner several years ago, Lauren Comba found herself riveted by its ancient story. Written, directed and acted entirely in the Inuktitut language, the 2001 landmark award-winning film retells an Inuit legend passed down through centuries of oral tradition. The film’s narrative was a part of history Comba had never heard…
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