New laser equipment gives medical technology developers a boost

Microfabrication tools allow inventors to design and test precision medical devices at rapid speeds

New laser equipment gives medical technology developers a boostIn the world of precision medicine, really, really small is a really big deal. That’s certainly the case for western Canadian entrepreneurs who have big ideas for tiny medical devices, thanks to a new investment from Western Economic Diversification Canada (WD) in a University of Alberta facility. Medical device developers now have access to $1.5 million in…

Artifacts from composer’s life included in international registry

Designation signifies late U of A professor’s importance to the Canadian cultural landscape as a renowned classical music composer

Artifacts from composer’s life included in international registryAn archival collection documenting the life and accomplishments of a University of Alberta music professor has struck a high note by earning a world-class designation. The Violet Archer fonds at the U of A has been accepted into the Canada Memory of the World Register, part of a UNESCO program that showcases the most meaningful documents in humanity’s…

Sensors embedded in bandages could monitor diabetic foot wounds

Tiny sensors could be used to detect and treat foot wounds before they get bad enough to require amputation

Sensors embedded in bandages could monitor diabetic foot woundsIt was sparked by a chance conversation. Simon Palfreyman and Manisha Gupta got to talking about their research after a meeting. He’s an expert in wound care and she’s a leader in making biosensors that can be attached to the skin to monitor things like temperature or the presence of germs. Palfreyman, an assistant professor…

Common chemotherapy drug linked to hearing loss in children

Half of children with cancer being treated with cisplatin suffer irreversible hearing loss

Common chemotherapy drug linked to hearing loss in childrenA University of Alberta research lab has helped identify a genetic variant that increases the risk of hearing loss in children with cancer who are treated with the widely used drug cisplatin. Amit Bhavsar, assistant professor in the Department of Medical Microbiology & Immunology and Canada Research Chair in Functional Genomic Medicine, led the U…

New texting services support first responders’ mental health

Daily positive messages are designed to help emergency personnel cope with trauma of the job, similar to successful Text4Hope

New texting services support first responders’ mental healthTwo free text messaging services have been launched to support the mental health of Alberta’s first responders. Text4PTSI and Text4Well-being are designed to help emergency personnel cope positively with feelings of stress, anxiety, depression, disturbed sleep and suicidal thoughts, said project lead Vincent Agyapong, clinical professor of psychiatry and global mental health in the University of Alberta Faculty…

Research project explores new way to boost canola production

Latest technology will test how well different breeds convert the power of the sun, offering hope of better yields for farmers

Research project explores new way to boost canola productionA University of Alberta researcher is working to capture the power of sunshine to boost canola yield for western Canadian farmers. Over the next three years, plant scientist Linda Gorim of the Faculty of Agricultural, Life & Environmental Sciences (ALES) will assess up to 300 breeding lines of canola from around the world to find out which are…

Professors promote science as a tool for Indigenous governance

Kim TallBear and Jessica Kolopenuk are addressing increasing demands for Indigenous governance in STEM

Professors promote science as a tool for Indigenous governanceIt’s a common misconception, Dr. Kim TallBear says, that while Indigenous peoples have culture and tradition, white people own science and technology. As TallBear mentions in a video trailer for one of the Faculty of Native Studies’ newest online courses, this myth doesn’t only undermine the myriad ways Indigenous peoples have produced science, technology and knowledge systems throughout history…

Coal mining waste material more than 90% effective at removing heavy metal

Nano humus works like a sponge that attaches to and holds cadmium, a common byproduct of mining

Coal mining waste material more than 90% effective at removing heavy metalA low-value byproduct of the coal mining process is proving highly effective at helping reclaim the land and water used in mining, University of Alberta research shows. Nano humus, a substance extracted from coal mine deposits and then crushed to a black, powdery material, has “outstanding physical and chemical properties” that remove heavy metals from…

Digital tech experts work to bring internet to rural and remote communities

Coalition they helped create will advocate, share ideas and shape policy aimed at improving access to broadband

Digital tech experts work to bring internet to rural and remote communitiesTwo University of Alberta professors are working to improve internet services for Albertans living in rural and remote communities as members of a new coalition. The Alberta Rural Connectivity Coalition (ARCC), which U of A digital technology experts Rob McMahon and Michael McNally helped found last fall, is working with steering committee members to bring together Alberta communities to explore ways…

Firefighters who fought Fort McMurray wildfire suffer persistent lung damage

With the risk of asthma more than doubling

Firefighters who fought Fort McMurray wildfire suffer persistent lung damageFirefighters at the centre of the battle against the massive Fort McMurray wildfire in 2016 have persistent lung damage, according to new findings published by a University of Alberta occupational health research team. “Those who were dealing with burning organic matter were exposed to a barrage of small particles in the smoke, and the ones with the…

U of A research, expertise help boost diamond exploration, says geologist

University's analytical facilities and expertise are second to none, as are its collaborative ties with industry

U of A research, expertise help boost diamond exploration, says geologistIn the early 2000s, one of the large islands that make up the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, Banks Island, was buzzing as teams from the world’s top diamond companies trudged around the barren tundra looking for evidence of diamonds. One organization encountered a big enough hint of what might lie below that they had equipment on…

Biophysicists target mechanism that makes Zika virus so dangerous

Paves the way for potential new drugs for viruses including dengue, yellow fever and West Nile

Biophysicists target mechanism that makes Zika virus so dangerousA new study by University of Alberta biophysicists has revealed how a rare structure forms within RNA from the Zika virus that makes it resistant to our bodies’ immune systems. The results provide a potential target for new drug therapies to combat the virus and others like it. “Due to the structure formed within the…

Nursing researcher fights ageism with education

Training modules, advisory group designed to help nurses, caregivers and others overcome biases against older people

Nursing researcher fights ageism with educationA University of Alberta researcher is hoping to start a Canada-wide revolution to combat discrimination against older people, starting with a change to the way nursing students are educated. “Ageism has been described by other scholars as the last “ism” that is socially accepted,” said Sherry Dahlke, associate professor in the Faculty of Nursing. “It’s subtle and…

Study finds link between gut bacteria and enhanced cognition in infant boys

Could potentially identify children at risk of neurodevelopmental disorders

Study finds link between gut bacteria and enhanced cognition in infant boysInfant boys with a higher composition of a particular gut microbiota show enhanced neurodevelopment, according to a new study. The University of Alberta-led research followed more than 400 infants from the CHILD Cohort Study (CHILD) at its Edmonton site. Boys with a gut bacterial composition that was high in the bacteria Bacteroidetes at one year of age…

Hepatitis C vaccine could be available within five years

Has the potential to save hundreds of thousands of lives each year

Hepatitis C vaccine could be available within five yearsA vaccine to protect against hepatitis C virus (HCV) could be in use within five years, according to University of Alberta Nobel laureate Michael Houghton, who made the announcement during a special presentation at this year’s European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases held in Vienna, Austria, over the weekend. “While the advent of directly…

Equipping young people to better manage their financial futures

Most Canadians live beyond their means

Equipping young people to better manage their financial futuresMost Canadians are living beyond their means, with a debt-to-income ratio of 181 per cent. More than half are within $200 of not being able to cover their bills and loan payments. These kinds of statistics make Faculty of Education professor Damien Cormier uneasy and prompted him to launch a research project to boost financial literacy in young…

Why some people overestimate their abilities while others underestimate

Most people tend to predict that others will do better than they will on difficult tasks

Why some people overestimate their abilities while others underestimateA lack of confidence in our abilities on a given task or activity seems to stem from overestimating the abilities of others, according to a University of Alberta study. The finding could offer leaders insights into how to counter self-doubt in the face of a difficult task. Previous research has shown that most people tend to…

How do zebra finches learn to build their nests?

By observing the building techniques of other birds

How do zebra finches learn to build their nests?Like archeologists learning how past humans built their homes, birds can learn construction techniques by observing unoccupied nests, according to a new study. University of Alberta scientists found that zebra finches learn about nest building by observing an empty nest – but only if they first learn what a nest is. “We gave half our…

Fecal transplant plus fibre supplements improve insulin sensitivity

Research provides further evidence the microbiome can benefit patients’ health

Fecal transplant plus fibre supplements improve insulin sensitivityA transplant of healthy gut microbes followed by fibre supplements benefits patients with severe obesity and metabolic syndrome, according to clinical trial findings published in Nature Medicine. Patients who were given a single-dose oral fecal microbial transplant followed by a daily fibre supplement were found to have better insulin sensitivity and higher levels of beneficial…

Aspirin could help prevent COVID-19 deaths

Common anti-inflammatory drugs could offer safer treatment than current options to help stop worst outcomes due to hyperinflammation

Aspirin could help prevent COVID-19 deathsA University of Alberta pharmacologist is encouraging the trial of common anti-inflammatory medications such as aspirin to treat the most harmful outcomes of COVID-19. Most people infected with SARS-CoV-2 recover without serious symptoms, reported Ayman El-Kadi, professor in the Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, in a recently published academic paper. However, some patients develop inflammation in the…

Student discovers threatened beetle is actually two separate subspecies

Discovery means the nationally threatened Gibson’s big sand tiger beetle is more at risk than previously thought

Student discovers threatened beetle is actually two separate subspeciesAn undergraduate research study has found that a threatened type of beetle found in Saskatchewan and Colorado is, in fact, made up of two genetically distinct subspecies. The discovery has important implications for conservation efforts for the insects and shows that both populations of Gibson’s big sand tiger beetle are more threatened than previously thought.…

Building neurotech community in Alberta earns student startup award

Eden Redman co-founded student group-turned-non-profit to support students exploring new ways for computers to interact with the brain

Building neurotech community in Alberta earns student startup awardEverything from brain-controlled prosthetics to games that are responsive to brain activity are within our grasp, according to University of Alberta student Eden Redman. Redman’s work promoting and expanding access to brainwave-sensing technology has earned him the Student Entrepreneur of the Year award at Startup Edmonton’s YEG Startup Community Awards. Announced at an online ceremony in May,…

Innovation provides edge in meeting growing demand for dietary fibre

Innovation attracting the interest of food companies looking to make their products healthier

Innovation provides edge in meeting growing demand for dietary fibreDemand for beta glucan fibre has been rising steadily in recent years, as mounting evidence suggests the dietary fibre can help lower cholesterol, reducing the risk of heart disease and control blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Best of all, it creates none of the side-effects of drugs and is fully recognized by the…

Preventing transmission of chronic wasting disease in white-tailed deer

Discovery of protein variant may reduce spread of the highly contagious and fatal neurological disease

Preventing transmission of chronic wasting disease in white-tailed deerA variant of the prion protein may reduce the spread of chronic wasting disease (CWD) among white-tailed deer, according to a new study by University of Alberta scientists. This variant of the prion protein, called the S96 variant, blocks CWD transmission in the lab – an important discovery in the fight against the highly contagious…

Three new programs prepare workers for careers in the digital economy

Businesses are looking for skilled workers as they quickly shift to the digital landscape

Three new programs prepare workers for careers in the digital economyThe University of Alberta is offering three new continuing education programs to meet a fast-growing need for digital job skills, opening the door for people with little or no technological experience to build new careers. The trio of programs, delivered through the Faculty of Extension beginning in July, will provide the skills needed to fill some of the…

Researcher helps transgender women be seen and heard for who they are

Speech-language pathologist leads study to learn from trans women how voice and non-verbal gestures contribute to their quality of life

Researcher helps transgender women be seen and heard for who they areHand gestures or tone of voice can give an instant impression about someone, and, for transgender women, that can be especially important. “Living in the society we live in, there are gender expectations for what a feminine communicator sounds like or looks like,” said Teresa Hardy, an instructor in the University of Alberta’s Faculty of Rehabilitation…

Lean on family, community after heartbreaking losses

Januel Ibasco kept his goals in sight despite the deaths of his mother and grandmother, and was inspired to explore his Filipino roots

Lean on family, community after heartbreaking lossesThe traditional Indigenous game of Back Push sees two competitors seated on the ground back-to-back with their arms locked. The object is to stand up together but push your opponent out of a designated area. The goal of a children’s version of the contest is to simply communicate and lean on each other so that,…

PhD grad finds her calling serving those who serve their country

As an occupational therapist and researcher, Chelsea Jones helps military members and veterans improve their physical and mental health

PhD grad finds her calling serving those who serve their countryChelsea Jones knew little about the military before becoming an occupational therapist, helping ease people out of their pain and back into their day-to-day lives. But when she realized there was a gap in the kind of treatment soldiers needed beyond physical therapy, she knew where she belonged. As she graduates this week with a…

Physiotherapy program combines business skills with patient care

Joseph El-Hamchaoui is the first grad of a new U of A master’s program that marries business and physical therapy

Physiotherapy program combines business skills with patient careComing from a business-oriented family, Joseph El-Hamchaoui has the entrepreneurial spirit in his DNA – but also a desire to help people. So when it came time to start his undergraduate education at the University of Alberta, he broke with tradition to study health care. A decade later, as he becomes the first graduate of…

Pharmacy doctoral grad’s international experience gives him unique perspective

Damion Barnes wants to help patients from all backgrounds improve their health, one achievable goal at a time

Pharmacy doctoral grad’s international experience gives him unique perspectiveDamion Barnes is known for his empathetic way of dealing with his pharmacy patients – but make no mistake, he’s all about setting goals and meeting them. His approach is to help people identify small, achievable steps so they can work toward the bigger target of improving their health. “The guidelines say, for example, 150…
1 2 3 15