I have diabetes. Here’s why I’m glad I live in Alberta

Having access to the Alberta Diabetes Institute makes living with diabetes a little easier

I have diabetes. Here’s why I’m glad I live in AlbertaBy Gillian Rutherford Contributor Troy Media People like me who live with diabetes have a lot to celebrate. It was 100 years ago that insulin was discovered and purified by a group of Canadian scientists, including the University of Alberta’s James Collip. That discovery commuted the death sentence of a diabetes diagnosis into a life…

Islet transplant patient 252: ‘A second chance at a better life’

Procedure developed at U of A guides islet cell transplants for people with Type 1 diabetes around the world

Islet transplant patient 252: ‘A second chance at a better life’Nina Greene’s diabetes was so hard to control, she had “Type 1 Diabetic” tattooed on her left wrist – a guarantee that emergency medical personnel could identify her illness quickly if she was found unconscious. Despite all her efforts to manage her diabetes, she wound up in hospital so often with high or low blood…

Next-generation genetic sequencing to detect pancreatic and biliary cancer

Nearly $1M awarded to seven new projects from U of A researchers focusing on cancer, pulmonary, diabetes and neurology research

Next-generation genetic sequencing to detect pancreatic and biliary cancerSeven new University of Alberta research projects focusing on cancer, pulmonary disease, diabetes and neurology are the latest recipients of funding from the 2020 Kaye Competition. The annual competition supports individuals and collaborative, interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary teams in the pursuit of research, innovation and quality-improvement programs and projects that seek to establish new approaches to patient…

Safer source of islet cells targeted for people with Type 1 diabetes

U of A researchers are harnessing AI to analyze patients’ own cells to create islet cells for transplant

Safer source of islet cells targeted for people with Type 1 diabetesUniversity of Alberta researchers are harnessing the power of artificial intelligence to find a safer, more personalized source of islet cells to treat Type 1 diabetes. The research project, a collaboration between the departments of surgery and computing science, aims to use AI to analyze images to speed up the process and reduce the need for human decision-making…

Tackle heart disease in people with Type 2 diabetes

U of A pharmacy researcher looks for ways to correct a common but often hidden type of diabetes-related heart failure

Tackle heart disease in people with Type 2 diabetesA University of Alberta laboratory has uncovered a new approach to preventing heart failure in people with Type 2 diabetes, according to research findings published recently in the journal Cell Reports. “We know people with diabetes take drugs for years to control their blood sugars, but the drugs don’t cure their diabetes,” said lead author John Ussher, associate…

Tackling heart disease in people with Type 2 diabetes

U of A pharmacy researcher looks for ways to correct a common but often hidden type of diabetes-related heart failure

Tackling heart disease in people with Type 2 diabetesA University of Alberta laboratory has uncovered a new approach to preventing heart failure in people with Type 2 diabetes, according to research findings published recently in the journal Cell Reports. “We know people with diabetes take drugs for years to control their blood sugars, but the drugs don’t cure their diabetes,” said lead author John Ussher, associate…

A Canadian path to a regenerative cure to Type 1 diabetes

A Canadian company has developed a revolutionary way to improve the lives of those with diabetes

A Canadian path to a regenerative cure to Type 1 diabetesFor people living with diabetes, the hope for a functional cure remains 100 years after Dr. Frederick Banting’s breakthrough discovery of insulin. In answer to those hopes, a Canadian company has developed a revolutionary way to improve the lives of those with diabetes. Insulin remains the standard of care for people living with diabetes. The…

Measuring the risk of heart disease, diabetes in obese children

Type of cholesterol produced as food consumed a strong predictor of future health risk

University of Alberta researchers have found a new, more effective way to measure future heart disease and diabetes risk in youth. By testing the blood for remnant cholesterol (RC), made by the body during the day as food is consumed, researchers were able to show that this non-fasting type of cholesterol is a strong predictor…

Virtual clinic pilot sees success in rural Alberta community

U of A spinoff company launches MedROAD virtual clinic in Alberta, making long-distance health care a reality during COVID-19

Virtual clinic pilot sees success in rural Alberta communityA new pilot project called MedROAD is bringing the power of precision health to Pincher Creek, Alta. – and seeing promising results. MedROAD promises to be the future of telehealth, leveraging the power of artificial intelligence and cloud-based computing to remotely connect patients with health-care professionals, no matter where they are. Developed at the University of Alberta by computing scientist Pierre…

Twenty stories that defined the University of Alberta in 2020

In a year of unprecedented challenges, the people of the U of A gave us plenty of reasons to expect a brighter future

Twenty stories that defined the University of Alberta in 2020Let’s be honest: 2020 has been a tough year. Amid a global pandemic whose rising tide continues to take an enormous human and economic toll every day, it’s been hard to hold out hope for whatever the “new normal” might look like once COVID-19 finally ebbs for good. But through everything – including academic and…

Stem cell therapy research for Type 1 diabetes receives funding

Three U of A researchers will help lead projects to advance treatments for patients

Stem cell therapy research for Type 1 diabetes receives fundingUniversity of Alberta researchers are among two Canadian research teams chosen for significant new funding from the government of Canada and JDRF Canada to develop new stem cell-based therapies for treating Type 1 diabetes. The projects will each receive $1.5 million from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research Institute of Nutrition, Metabolism and Diabetes (CIHR-INMD), along with…

Diabetes research closer than ever to possible cure

As close to a cure for diabetes as we’re ever going to see

Diabetes research closer than ever to possible cureAs the world prepares to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the discovery of insulin next year, researchers at the University of Alberta are hard at work on what they hope will become the next big diabetes breakthrough. The project is led by James Shapiro, professor of surgery in the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry and Canada Research…

Research opens new path for diagnosing and treating diabetes

Only a “proof of concept” at this stage, but validates the need for further research

Research opens new path for diagnosing and treating diabetesA team of researchers led by a University of Alberta pharmacology professor has mapped the function and gene expression of individual insulin-producing cells within the human pancreas, opening new paths of research for diagnosing and treating diabetes. “There’s been a lot of excitement the last few years about understanding how pancreatic beta cells make insulin,” said Patrick MacDonald,…

Type 2 diabetes drug buys time for a failing heart: study

The diabetes drug increased ketone levels, which might be the key to improving cardiac metabolism

Type 2 diabetes drug buys time for a failing heart: studyIn 2015, researchers began noticing that a drug used to treat Type 2 diabetes, empagliflozin, came with the added benefit of decreasing hospitalization for heart failure and death from cardiovascular causes in those patients. “It was very unexpected, because this drug is targeted and marketed for Type 2 diabetes, not heart failure,” said Kim Ho,…

Report card evaluates influences on children’s healthy food choices

Poor diet right behind tobacco consumption as leading cause of premature death for Canadians, says public health expert

Report card evaluates influences on children’s healthy food choicesEverything from advertising to school cafeteria menus can affect whether children develop lifelong healthy eating habits, according to the sixth annual Nutrition Report Card for Alberta. The report evaluates 39 indicators in five food “environments” – physical (what food is available?), economic (how affordable is healthy food?), communication (what messages are children getting about food through…

Patient-led movement creating better diabetes treatment

U of A PhD candidate studies and participates in grassroots movement to hack diabetes equipment

Patient-led movement creating better diabetes treatmentPeople with Type 1 diabetes – including University of Alberta graduate student Jonathan Garfinkel – are using free instructions from the Internet to build an artificial pancreas. The patient-led movement is pushing pharmaceutical companies to improve the treatments they offer, according to U of A diabetes expert Peter Light. “Diabetics have developed, programmed and are now living…

Suffering from chronic pain? Don’t give up hope

Many people have ongoing pain where there is no obvious injury, or continue to have pain at the site of an injury long after it has healed

Suffering from chronic pain? Don’t give up hopeChronic pain impacts the lives of many Canadians every day. Thousands wake up every morning to pain, deal with it throughout the day and don’t even escape its clutches as they sleep. Neuropathic pain is a very common chronic condition that poses a challenge for doctors. It's the result of a primary lesion or dysfunction in…

We must do more for seniors coming home from hospital

It's clear the status quo isn’t meeting the needs of our aging population. So what can be done?

We must do more for seniors coming home from hospitalBy Ruta Valaitis and Maureen Markle-Reid McMaster University Despite having diabetes and arthritis, Verne was a thriving independent 72-year-old who lived at home with his wife when he had a stroke. He had excellent emergency care in the hospital and began his recovery there. But he didn’t adjust well after arriving home. He started to…

Rethinking type 2 diabetes

It’s time to stop blaming individuals for poor eating choices, and move toward community action

Rethinking type 2 diabetesJournalist H.L. Mencken wrote that “for every complex problem there is a solution that is clear, simple and wrong.” That observation aptly describes a prevailing attitude toward type 2 diabetes, which characterizes diabetes as a problem that could clearly be fixed if people would simply move more and eat less. Such a suggestion ignores much…

Diabetes may double risk of developing depression

Two of the primary risk factors for the disease are obesity and lack of exercise

Diabetes may double risk of developing depressionDiabetes is one of the leading health problems affecting North America today and is rapidly on the rise. It is also well known that this disease can cause serious health complications such as vision loss and amputation as well as life-threatening problems like stroke, heart disease and kidney failure. Indeed, diabetes, which affects the body’s…

Exercise, professional support key to managing type 2 diabetes

Some studies have shown exercise can reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes by 50 per cent

Exercise, professional support key to managing type 2 diabetesThe studies are clear. Supervised physical activity, counselling and exercise are essential to both managing type 2 diabetes and reducing the incidence of this life-threatening disease. Among the most important benefits of controlled movement and exercise are increased metabolic rate; increased insulin sensitivity; improved glycemic control and decreased risk of cardiovascular disease. Some studies have…

We need to get children off the couch

It’s sad when adults choose to be inactive. It’s even sadder when we don’t provide our children the opportunity to establish physically-active lifestyles

We need to get children off the couchOur children have never been more sedentary. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 2016, only 21.6 per cent of children and adolescents in the United States aged six to 19 met the recommended 60 or more minutes of moderate-to-vigorous activity at least five times a week. It’s a safe bet that…

Should food consumers get on the keto bandwagon?

A recent poll tells us that 26% of Canadians have either adopted the ketogenic diet, tried it or considered it in. But there are meany health questions

Should food consumers get on the keto bandwagon?Are you on the ketogenic diet? Apparently, many people are or have tried it in the last year or so. It may be the most popular dietary trend in North America right now. Over the last 12 months, the word ‘keto’ was the most googled food-related topic in the world, not just in Canada. The…

Canada must protect its drug supply

Canada’s drug supply is meant to provide for 37 million Canadians, not 370 million Americans. U.S. cross-border shopping could endanger Canadians

Canada must protect its drug supplyWhen U.S. presidential candidate Bernie Sanders joined a caravan of diabetics for a cross-border shopping trip to buy Canadian insulin, it was a deliberate attempt to publicize his proposed policies to reform health care. He likely had no idea that the media coverage of his actions would set off alarm bells among Canadians and even…

Deeply flawed soda tax rife with unintended consequences

Evidence in other countries shows that consumption taxes don't address the root targets in meaningful ways

Deeply flawed soda tax rife with unintended consequencesBy Ashley Stedman and Jake Fuss The Fraser Institute Policy-makers and pundits have mused recently about a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages to fight obesity and other-health related issues in Canada. It’s a bad idea that should be abandoned. According to Mark Holland, Liberal MP for Ajax, Ont., a ‘soda tax’ will “push consumers away from…

We’re letting Canadian kids eat themselves sick

A bill that would protect children is languishing in the Senate. We need it to tackle childhood obesity and chronic diseases

We’re letting Canadian kids eat themselves sickIf you’ve ever watched the hit TV series Mad Men, you’ll remember that everybody smoked. Everyone. Everywhere. It was a great show, in part, because it was like a trip back in time, showing us what life was like in the American advertising industry in the early 1960s. Smoking was just a part of normal…

We must do more for seniors coming home from hospital

It's clear the status quo isn’t meeting the needs of our aging population. So what can be done?

We must do more for seniors coming home from hospitalBy Ruta Valaitis and Maureen Markle-Reid EvidenceNetwork.ca Despite having diabetes and arthritis, Verne was a thriving independent 72-year-old who lived at home with his wife when he had a stroke. He had excellent emergency care in the hospital and began his recovery there. But he didn’t adjust well after arriving home. He started to show…

The diet shell game

Stick to the evidence when reporting on – and endorsing – food studies. We need real solutions to obesity and Type 2 diabetes, not sales jobs

The diet shell gameTwo of the best-known American food journalists have been telling readers that the DASH and Mediterranean diets aren’t best for our health. But the evidence tells a different story. The journalists are Gary Taubes, the author of The Case Against Sugar, and Nina Teicholz, the author of the bestselling The Big Fat Surprise. In their recent Los…