Questions you need to ask before you cast your ballot

We accept that the world intervenes in any plans for the future but we must still decide who gets our vote

Questions you need to ask before you cast your ballotThe 2021 federal election is upon us. In Canada, we’re blessed to have fair elections, the results of which are peacefully implemented – so don’t forget to vote. There are many nations where people can’t vote. There are many more where their vote doesn’t matter because tyrants have predetermined the results or will use violence…

Politicians need to practice what they preach and pay back wage subsidy

NDP, Liberals and Conservatives all helped themselves to the wage subsidy meant for struggling businesses

Politicians need to practice what they preach and pay back wage subsidyPoliticians are good at preaching, but they’re not so good at practicing what they preach. Case in point: the federal wage subsidy. Federal politicians have been moralizing about the evils of business executives taking bonuses while collecting the pandemic wage subsidy, but their silence on their own party taking the subsidy is deafening. At the…

Politicians are long on promises but short on delivery

None of the major parties have a realistic plan to get the nation’s finances in order

Politicians are long on promises but short on deliveryPoliticians have made promises that will cost tens of billions of dollars during this election. But when it comes time to open their wallets to pay the tab, these party leaders are running to hide in the bathroom while taxpayers cover the bill. Politicians and taxpayers both need to understand a simple truth: there is…

CUPE wants its weight in gold – paid for by the taxpayer

Union leaders in New Brunswick demanding nothing less than a 20 per cent raise over the next four years

CUPE wants its weight in gold – paid for by the taxpayerIt seems like nothing short of their weight in gold will satisfy CUPE union leaders in New Brunswick. Over the next four years, CUPE is demanding nothing less than a 20 per cent raise. This would cost New Brunswick taxpayers an extra $158 million per year once fully implemented. It would already be an unrealistic…

Oil and gas taxes play significant role in Canadian social programs

If the sector disappeared, taxes would have to be increased substantially to provide us with the services we have come to expect

Oil and gas taxes play significant role in Canadian social programsBy Mark Milke and Lennie Kaplan Canadian Energy Centre Between 1969 and 2019, Canadian parents received $499 billion in family allowance payments and children’s benefits from the federal government. That 50-year cost was matched by $505 billion in revenues to governments from the oil and gas sector – except that such taxpayer cash was collected…

Ontario gas prices hit seven-year high

Without taxes, the price of gas per litre today would be sitting at 92 cents

Ontario gas prices hit seven-year highHardworking taxpayers are facing record-high gas prices, and politicians are the culprits driving up the bills. In Ontario, up to 38 per cent of the price of gas that we are charged at the pumps comes from taxes, according to a report released by the Canadian Taxpayers Federation. And that percentage is only set to…

How to reduce our emissions without penalizing rural regions

Policies should be fair for all Canadians, regardless of where they happen to live

How to reduce our emissions without penalizing rural regionsBy Miguel Ouellette Olivier Rancourt and Krystle Wittevrongel Montreal Economic Institute Reducing our greenhouse gas emissions is one of the big concerns of our age. The numerous diverging interests pitted against each other on this issue make it a real puzzler for policy-makers, though. After many years of public policies aimed at reducing GHGs, layered…

Wealth taxes ultimately cripple economic growth

The rich put their earnings into new ideas, venture capital funds and angel investments

Wealth taxes ultimately cripple economic growthThere has been increasing clamour from some circles to impose a wealth tax upon Canadians. The usual government-expanding social ‘democratic’ pressure and interest groups are especially enthused by the idea. They also claim it’s popular among the public. A one-time tax of three per cent on individuals with wealth above $10 million and five per cent…

Taxpayers still waiting for a credible plan to balance the books

$424 million(!) being added to the debt every single day

Taxpayers still waiting for a credible plan to balance the booksBy Franco Terrazzano and Jay Goldberg Canadian Taxpayers Federation If the federal government’s fiscal policy stays on its current trajectory, Canada’s trillion-dollar debt will be a major drain on taxpayers’ wallets for generations to come. In this election, voters will need to closely examine parties’ plans to plug that drain. Unfortunately, the current Liberal plan…

Carbon tax a crushing load at the fuel pump

Owners of the most popular vehicles in Canada will pay much more in carbon taxes in coming years

Carbon tax a crushing load at the fuel pumpBy Mark Milke and Lennie Kaplan Canadian Energy Centre Except for a few blessed spots in southern Ontario and southern British Columbia, Canada is a cold northern country. That means that for six months of the year or more, snow can pile up on streets, highways, your driveway, and condominium and apartment exit ramps. And…

Can we afford $10-a-day childcare?

The simple answer is no

Can we afford $10-a-day childcare?Providing quality care for preschool children is a good thing. Children learn to socialize in groups beyond their family. They acquire the skills and readiness that will allow them to succeed in elementary school and later in life. With children well looked after, all parents are free to take jobs or pursue careers contributing to…

It’s time for political welfare to go the way of the dodo bird

It’s time to take the cake away from Ontario’s politicians. It’s time to end political welfare

It’s time for political welfare to go the way of the dodo birdOntario’s political parties have a bad spending habit, but they don’t have to pay for it because taxpayers get stuck with their political welfare scheme. In Ontario, political parties are given millions from the pockets of hardworking taxpayers through a system referred to as the per-vote subsidy. This money does not go toward funding their…

Higher taxes won’t solve our crippling fiscal problems

Instead, the government should be working at finding ways to control spending

Higher taxes won’t solve our crippling fiscal problemsCanadian politicians appear to be gearing up for an election campaign in which they will be asked how they would handle the myriad issues facing the country. Two of our most pressing concerns are Canada’s crippling debt and sky-high deficits. As the Parliamentary Budget Officer (PBO) recently noted , we are currently on track for…

Child-care subsidies won’t stimulate the economy

Officials need to streamline and eliminate child-care regulations

Child-care subsidies won’t stimulate the economyThe federal government has spotted another pretext to increase its intrusion in our lives: subsidized child care. Despite knowing economic lockdowns have caused massive job losses, federal officials argue that unaffordable child care impedes women from returning to the workforce. Subsidies are a shallow, top-down policy that would generate aid dependency from child-care centres and…

Bureaucrats living high off the hog at taxpayers expense

Ottawa’s public service has swelled by roughly 10,000 bureaucrats per year under Trudeau

Bureaucrats living high off the hog at taxpayers expenseCOVID-19 has shone a light on a fundamental divide within Canada: the growing government bureaucracy and those forced to pay for it. This contrast is illustrated by Statistics Canada’s latest jobs report. The private sector, including the self-employed, has shed 520,400 jobs since COVID-19 hit us, while the number of government jobs across the country…

You’re on the hook for $57,000 in government debt

We have to start demanding that politicians start making some tough choices

You’re on the hook for $57,000 in government debtFifty-seven thousand dollars. That’s the average amount each Canadian will owe in provincial and federal government debt by the end of the year. It’s not just the rich or big corporations that will be mopping up this budget mess if politicians don’t take some air out of their bloated budgets. Politicians are already starting to…

Robbing Peter to pay Paul with energy subsidies?

There is no subsidy pot of gold going to oil and gas companies that can be diverted to renewable energy ventures

Robbing Peter to pay Paul with energy subsidies?By Mark Milke and Lennie Kaplan Canadian Energy Centre When the issue of taxpayer subsidies for energy comes up – oil and gas and renewables alike – the public, policy-makers and media could be forgiven if they feel like they’re drowning. Endless decimal points and numbers that run into the trillions can make it near…

Manitoba unprepared for coming fiscal, political storms

Manitoba’s provincial government depends on long-calcified federal transfer programs to fund 37% of its budget

Manitoba unprepared for coming fiscal, political stormsAround 1915, Winnipeg was frequently described as a second Chicago, a serious transportation hub with a bustling private economy. In 1921, it was the third-largest city in Canada. In the 1960s, Winnipeg was Western Canada’s corporate headquarters city. Today, Winnipeg is Canada’s ninth-largest city, known more in the United States, if not by most Canadians,…

Global tax cartel is a march to higher taxes

... and more corporate welfare

Global tax cartel is a march to higher taxesCanadian politicians like Chrystia Freeland see tax competition as a “race to the bottom.” But for the rest of us, a global tax cartel will mean an inevitable march toward higher tax bills and more pork for companies with access to politicians. Freeland agreed to the American-led proposal for a global minimum business tax of…

Crown corporations are simply money pits

They are a bad idea and should be sold off

Crown corporations are simply money pitsReports, studies and analyses show that the essential character of state-owned enterprises, including Canadian Crown corporations, makes it impossible for them to have true independence or real profitability. These operations have inherent goals counter to the normal private sector pursuit of profit maximization. In the private sector, return on investment rewards shareholders for the risk…

Time to bring Governor General perks back down to planet Earth

When a new governor general takes the controls as head of state, the routine waste of money at that office needs to stop

Time to bring Governor General perks back down to planet EarthIt’s a rare event when the stars align in the cosmos of Ottawa to create the perfect opportunity for politicians to save taxpayers some money. That phenomenon is happening now. Ottawa is facing a black hole of debt. It needs to save money, and that signal needs to come from the top. When a new…

Why wealth taxes hamper economies and punish us all

What you tax more of, you get less of

Why wealth taxes hamper economies and punish us allCalls by self-identified progressives and others who purport to champion equity, compelling everyone to pay their fair share, have grown louder and more strident. It seems these social justice warriors have discovered previously unknown inner fiscal conservatism, with their usual zeal for redistribution and punishment for those who they deem have excessive wealth. It’s wealth…

Pepsi tax a sour deal for Newfoundland and Labrador taxpayers

Government maintains its sugar tax is all about keeping you healthy

Pepsi tax a sour deal for Newfoundland and Labrador taxpayersWhat’s all about sweets, sours your wallet and leaves a bitter taste? It’s Premier Andrew Furey’s proposal for a new Pepsi tax. This tax will increase the price of soft drinks by 20 cents a litre. By this time next year, you’ll be paying 15 per cent more for a two-litre bottle of Pepsi at…

Freeland doubles down despite dismal pre-COVID economic numbers

The government requires a complete 180-degree turn in policy

Freeland doubles down despite dismal pre-COVID economic numbersBy Jason Clemens Milagros Palacios and Niels Veldhuis The Fraser Institute In a recent interview, federal Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland explained the need to focus on economic growth to deal with many of Canada’s fiscal issues, including our high debt levels. Minister Freeland is correct that higher rates of economic growth would solve many of…

Global corporate tax rate will hamstring economy

A global minimum corporate tax is a 20th-century solution imposed on the 21st-century, where the digital realm is disrupting taxation

Global corporate tax rate will hamstring economyWorld leaders should resist U.S. pressure to enact a global minimum corporate tax, despite a recent move by the G7 countries to adopt the plan. It would harm corporations, small companies, workers and consumers while discouraging investment and wealth creation. If anything, the world needs more competition for post-pandemic recovery. U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen’s…

B.C. drivers burned by highest gas taxes in Canada

It costs about $50 extra in taxes to fill up a minivan in Metro Vancouver, not including the cost of the fuel

B.C. drivers burned by highest gas taxes in CanadaAs we see the light at the end of the COVID Tunnel of Hell, many families hope to hit the roads to explore beautiful British Columbia this summer. Safe road trips will be essential after the strain many have been under during the pandemic. But, because B.C. drivers are being burned by the highest gas…

It’s time for Alberta professors and bureaucrats to take a pay cut

It’s unfair to make Albertans struggling through the pandemic to pay for bigger salaries for post-secondary employees

It’s time for Alberta professors and bureaucrats to take a pay cutMany bureaucrats and professors have been collecting bigger paycheques during the pandemic, which means bigger bills for struggling families and students at the worst possible time. More than 11,500 university and college employees received a pay raise in 2020, which cost taxpayers and students $29 million, according to freedom of information requests obtained by the…

Sugar-coating a sugar tax won’t make it any more palatable

If Newfoundland and Labrador pursues a sugar tax, it’s certainly not to get its people to lead healthier lives. It’s about paying bills

Sugar-coating a sugar tax won’t make it any more palatableIn its recent budget, the Newfoundland and Labrador government announced it will introduce a tax of 20 cents per litre on sugary drinks, starting on April 1, 2022. This a first in Canada. So far we know very little about how the tax would work, which products would be affected and how revenues from the…
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