Pediatric heart transplant method allows for better outcomes

Blood-type-incompatible heart transplant surgery for infants under the age of two pioneered in Canada, now used worldwide

Pediatric heart transplant method allows for better outcomesA pediatric heart transplant procedure pioneered by Canadian doctors – once deemed impossible – has been shown to be at least as effective as the traditional approach, according to newly published research in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health. ABO-incompatible heart transplantation was developed in the mid-1990s, after a Canadian transplant team led by Lori West realized that infants…

Why kids often don’t stick with physiotherapy exercises

Sport-related injuries affect up to a third of Canadian teens yearly, says researcher recommending ways to help kids follow exercise plans

Why kids often don’t stick with physiotherapy exercisesYoung patients who don’t do their exercises tend to be one of the biggest challenges for physiotherapists, and a University of Alberta study reveals some of the reasons why. Lack of time – and lack of fun – are two of the main reasons kids with musculoskeletal conditions such as scoliosis, juvenile arthritis and sports injuries tend…

How changing boreal forests could affect caribou

Researchers examine what logging, climate change and other factors mean for caribou populations

How changing boreal forests could affect caribouNew research by University of Alberta biologists paints a clearer picture of how food webs are shifting in response to changing habitats in Canada’s boreal forests, and what it means for dwindling caribou populations. “We know that habitat, prey and predators such as wolves are all pieces of the caribou conservation puzzle, and here we…

University of Alberta and Telus partner on a 5G ‘living lab’

$15M investment focuses U of A’s innovation and commercialization capabilities, starting with precision agriculture, autonomous vehicles

University of Alberta and Telus partner on a 5G ‘living lab’The University of Alberta has announced a five-year partnership with Telus to establish a 5G “Living Lab” at the U of A that will contribute to a pipeline of new research and technology with commercial applications. It will also support the development of the talent pool needed to enhance economic recovery and diversification in Alberta.…

Nanotechnology could significantly reduce industrial use of freshwater

Advance in water filtration technology has applications everywhere from the energy industry and agriculture to municipal water treatment

Nanotechnology could significantly reduce industrial use of freshwaterIn 2017, University of Alberta mechanical engineering professor Mohtada Sadrzadeh found himself presenting his work on a new water treatment technology at the Canadian Oil Sands Innovation Alliance (COSIA) conference right after a researcher from an IBM research centre who was pitching almost exactly the same technology. “It was strange for me at first — you hear the name…

Researchers warn of unintended poisonings from hand sanitizer

There has been a 73 per cent increase in calls to Alberta Poison and Drug Information Service in 2020

Researchers warn of unintended poisonings from hand sanitizerOur obsession with killing germs during the COVID-19 pandemic has had an unintended and dangerous consequence, according to the University of Alberta’s Injury Prevention Centre: a sharp increase in unintentional poisonings due to hand sanitizers, disinfectants and household cleaners. Calls to Alberta’s Poison and Drug Information Service (PADIS) related to these products have increased by 73 per cent…

Project aims to help Alberta teachers, students build hope during pandemic

U of A education researchers team up with Edmonton teachers to create activities meant to foster hope and resilience in challenging times

Project aims to help Alberta teachers, students build hope during pandemicA new project from researchers at the University of Alberta is helping bring the power of hope to schools during the pandemic. Working with teachers from Edmonton’s public and Catholic school divisions, researchers in the Faculty of Education and one of its research units, Hope Studies Central, have co-developed hope-focused activities that teachers can blend into existing classroom…

Ultrasound has potential for treating pain after chemotherapy

There may soon be a new option available to people experiencing sensory pain after chemotherapy

Ultrasound has potential for treating pain after chemotherapyTherapeutic ultrasound was a tool in Janice Yurick’s treatment arsenal for 15 years. Yurick, a now-retired physical therapist and former manager of supportive care services at the Cross Cancer Institute in Edmonton, Alberta had more than two decades of experience in oncology rehabilitation. She used the technology with patients and saw results, despite no actual…

Treat your toaster as part of the family; it’s good for the environment

Really want to reduce waste? Take care of your possessions and use them to their full potential

Treat your toaster as part of the family; it’s good for the environmentThere’s a belief that storing material goods is less wasteful because it keeps them out of the landfill. Not only is that view short-sighted, but a University of Alberta marketing researcher said it also fails to consider the loss of utility that could have been put to use by someone else. Saurabh Rawal, a marketing…

Study hopes to find ways to contain spread of mountain pine beetles

Mountain pine beetles can be an important contributor to forest health, but ...

Study hopes to find ways to contain spread of mountain pine beetlesIn a new study aimed at assisting efforts to contain the destructive spread of mountain pine beetles, University of Alberta biologists examined their flight techniques and used genetic information to track how they are spreading through the province. “One of the reasons these beetles have become such a problem is because of the difficulty in…

‘Germ hunters’ discover rare lung disease in rural Alberta

‘Germ hunters’ discover rare lung disease in rural AlbertaA rare lung disease that is linked to bats has made Alberta home, according to new research led by scientists at Alberta Precision Laboratories (APL) and the University of Alberta. The team of infectious disease experts confirmed that histoplasmosis – a fungal infection transmitted through bat and bird droppings – is now found in Alberta. Their…

Innovative livestock grazing approach could reduce greenhouse gases

Innovative livestock grazing approach could reduce greenhouse gasesAn innovative approach to livestock grazing could help eliminate climate change-causing greenhouse gases, according to a new study. The research shows that a strategy called adaptive multi-paddock (AMP) grazing extracts methane gas from the atmosphere, locking it inside the soil through microbial activity. Methane gas has a climate warming effect that is 28 times more potent…

Designing ‘forever homes’ where people can stay as they grow older

Innovative, low-cost features that make it easier for homeowners to maintain their independence over the long term

Designing ‘forever homes’ where people can stay as they grow olderWhat does a home look like for someone who wants to stay there as they grow older? It’s a question that a University of Alberta researcher and an Edmonton-based homebuilder are tackling through innovative design. Collaborating with Effect Home Builders and using evidence-based research, doctoral candidate Lara Pinchbeck is helping identify meaningful features that can help design forever…

Métis PhD student, businesswoman appointed to new federal task force

Raylene Whitford will advise the government on how to provide equitable economic recovery for women

Métis PhD student, businesswoman appointed to new federal task forceMétis Ph.D. student and businesswoman has been appointed to the new federal Task Force on Women in the Economy. She is working alongside 17 other women from across the country to advise the government on a pathway to a national feminist economic recovery from the effects of the pandemic. The task force was announced on March…

New canola-killing clubroot strains found in Western Canada

Their emergence of nine new strains points to the importance of broader strategies to protect crops in Western Canada

New canola-killing clubroot strains found in Western CanadaNine new strains of clubroot – a disease that can kill canola crops – have been discovered in Western Canadian fields. While that’s not good news for producers, the discovery shows how important it is to build a multi-pronged strategy for protecting their crops, not relying solely on canola plants bred to resist the disease,…

Critical reagents needed for COVID-19 testing now produced in Canada

Up until now, Canada has been highly dependent on foreign suppliers

Critical reagents needed for COVID-19 testing now produced in CanadaUniversity of Alberta spinoff company Applied Quantum Materials Inc. (AQM) is using its chemical production expertise to partner with Alberta Health Services (AHS) and Alberta Precision Labs to provide critical reagents needed for COVID-19 testing. “These reagents – or ‘magnetic beads’ – used in standard nucleic acid testing are the gold standard for molecular tests,” said Stacey Hume, associate professor in…

Pharmacy students lend a steady hand with COVID-19 vaccine rollout

Doing their final work placements before graduation

Pharmacy students lend a steady hand with COVID-19 vaccine rolloutOn the first day COVID-19 vaccines were given at the southeast Edmonton pharmacy where Mina Nagib works, the atmosphere was electric. “People came dressed up to get their vaccine, wearing suits or traditional dress,” he said. “It was a celebrated event – a major milestone for the patients and for the pharmacists.” The student in…

U of A researcher to work with N.W.T. communities to promote vaccinations

Project to develop culturally appropriate program is among 19 projects to receive funding from Canadian Institutes of Health Research

U of A researcher to work with N.W.T. communities to promote vaccinationsA University of Alberta researcher will consult with two Indigenous communities in the Northwest Territories to co-create a culturally appropriate promotion program for the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection and the main cause of cervical cancer worldwide, but it is preventable with a vaccine for females aged nine to…

Researcher designs better ventilation controls to stop spread of Covid-19

New approach controls viruses indoors to hopefully avoid future pandemic shutdowns

Researcher designs better ventilation controls to stop spread of Covid-19An engineering researcher is building smarter controls for building ventilation systems to maximize fresh air intake and minimize the spread of viruses such as SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19. Yousef Alipouri’s project is one of six to receive new funding from the Alberta Innovates Graduate Fellowship in Health Innovation. “With our approach we can control viruses indoors…

Grads strive to improve care for LGBTQ2SPIA+ cancer patients

National survey identifies potential issues and areas for improvement among radiation therapy professionals

Grads strive to improve care for LGBTQ2SPIA+ cancer patientsA new study led by a group of recently graduated radiation therapy students at the University of Alberta shows that many in the profession feel more training is needed to properly care for cancer patients in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, queer, two-spirit, pansexual, intersex, asexual, plus (LGBTQ2SPIA+) community. The team – Samantha Chan, Samie…

Regular exercise may help expecting moms stave off depression

Study suggests following physical activity guidelines could help a vulnerable group that is bearing the brunt of social isolation

Regular exercise may help expecting moms stave off depressionNew moms and pregnant mothers-to-be who were physically active in the early days of the pandemic had a 30 per cent less chance of experiencing depression, according to a study that also shows this already vulnerable group continues to bear the brunt of the isolation measures. “It’s not like it was a big shock that…

Protective masks found to be safe for moderate and heavy exercise

Evidence review shows wearing a mask during exercise doesn’t affect cardiopulmonary function

Protective masks found to be safe for moderate and heavy exerciseA review of evidence by a team of Canadian and U.S.-based researchers shows that for most people, using face masks during moderate to heavy exercise does not affect lung function. The review, published in Annals of the American Thoracic Society, and referenced in guidance issued from the World Health Organization, examined the effects of various face masks and…

Adjusting language can improve the health of LGBTQ+ patients

Two-spirit Indigenous nurse will share insights at upcoming Inclusive Health Conference

Adjusting language can improve the health of LGBTQ+ patientsPronouns are a matter of life or death for Keith King, a registered nurse who identifies as two-spirit and Métis. “When I greet a new patient I’ll say, ‘Hi, my name’s Keith, I’m a registered nurse and my pronouns are he/him. What can I do for you today?’” King said. “And that just sets the stage…

Indigenous language learning made easy through technology

After finding few digital resources available, Delaney Lothian decided to create a game and app for learning Cree language

Indigenous language learning made easy through technologyDelaney Lothian jumped at the chance to take an introductory Cree language course – an opportunity to expand beyond the programming languages of her computing science major at the University of Alberta. Like any 21st-century student, she turned to the internet for help. To her surprise, she found very few digital resources for Cree. “The…

Made-in-Alberta COVID-19 vaccine candidate goes to clinical trials

DNA-based vaccine offers advantages that could make it easier to get into the arms of Canadians if approved

Made-in-Alberta COVID-19 vaccine candidate goes to clinical trialsA made-in-Alberta COVID-19 vaccine is taking a major step forward on the path to Health Canada approval with the start of a Phase 1 clinical trial. Entos Pharmaceuticals, an Edmonton company led by CEO and University of Alberta researcher John Lewis, has shipped a vaccine for testing to the Canadian Centre for Vaccinology in Halifax. The…

Celebrating the life of David Schindler

The U of A community mourns the loss of the world-renowned ecologist and environmentalist, and honours his achievements

Celebrating the life of David SchindlerThe University of Alberta is mourning the loss of ecology professor emeritus David Schindler, a devoted family man, friend and mentor, and one of the world’s strongest and most respected voices addressing one of the planet’s most pressing issues – ensuring water safety and sustainability. Schindler was 80. Born August 3, 1940, in Fargo, N.D.,…

Pushing boundaries so women don’t have to ‘suffer in silence’

In honour of International Women’s Day, we celebrate three research-focused clinicians who are improving women’s health

Pushing boundaries so women don’t have to ‘suffer in silence’As the world marks International Women’s Day, we celebrate the scientists who are working to improve women’s health. More than 140 researchers are working on women, children’s and perinatal medicine through the Women and Children's Health Research Institute (WCHRI) at the University of Alberta, supported by the Alberta Women’s Health Foundation and the Stollery Children’s Foundation.…

Initiative to raise awareness of women’s health research launched

Women’s Health Collective Canada will support research to fill knowledge gaps and meet women’s unique health needs, along with educating

Initiative to raise awareness of women’s health research launchedWomen make up roughly half the population and have given birth to everyone, yet have remained largely excluded from medical research and drug trials, according to Sharlene Rutherford, president and CEO of the Royal Alexandra Hospital Foundation (RAHF). “We know it can take 17 years for medical research to filter down to clinical practice, and women…

New funding could help scientists unlock the quantum internet

Will help researchers build next-gen, ultra-secure networks for quantum computers

New funding could help scientists unlock the quantum internetOn Oct. 29, 1969, researchers at UCLA, with help from a computer the size of a cement truck, sent what would become the first message over the first incarnation of the “internet” to Stanford. The first two letters of the one-word message, LOGIN, made the cross-California trip before the fledgling system crashed. “Fifty years ago…
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